Top 4 professions desperately needed for West African communities

Marginalized West African communities usually struggle with having certain jobs filled up or having certain positions occupied. These discrepancies occur for a number of reasons, most of which are financially motivated. Finances, or the lack of, lead to prominent gaps in the system, usually in the medical and educational fields. This post will be discussing the top 5 professions needed in marginalized and vulnerable West African communities. It is important to note that these professions are essential but what is more essential are the systems that will enable the existence of these professions. Without further ado, let’s delve in.

 

1.Teachers – Standard teachers are often scarce in vulnerable communities. A mixture of low morale, small financial incentives, and lack of infrastructure leads to the absence of most, if not all qualified teachers. It is important that we do not blame the teachers because nine times out of ten they are also in financial hardship. We should work towards creating stable systems that motivate and encourage standard teachers to stay in their communities instead of leaving in search of greener pastures.

We can do this through the building of standard schools, providing sanitation services at the schools so that all students are encouraged to come to school (i.e female students on their period).

2. Medical Doctors – With the help of programs and institutions like Doctors without Borders, some vulnerable communities have received treatment from standard doctors and medical facilities. However, it is important to note that these services are usually only offered to communities in dire or immediate need. During the Ebola Outbreak in Liberia, many global organizations reached out to help curb the virus that killed over 4,000 Liberians. This was a courageous feat. However, to create strong communities, vulnerable countries like Liberia need constant medical professionals in place due to the frequent cholera outbreaks and the frequency of diarrheal diseases. It is also important to note that curbing these diseases require hygiene practices, treatment, and diagnosis that medical doctors can provide. Owing to these reasons, vulnerable communities are often in need of medical doctors.

3. Gynecologists- Gynecologists are medical physicians with specialized training in pregnancy, childbirth, and the reproductive system. The maternal mortality rate in West Africa is 311 for every 100,000 live births in developed areas and 852 in rural areas. This number differs across West African countries. For example, the maternal mortality rate in Nigeria is 881 for every 100,000 live births. In Liberia, it is around 1,000 for every 100,000 live births. A host of things causes these high figures such as hemorrhages, uterine rupture, eclampsia and infectious diseases. These factors are motivated by the absence of maternity wards, properly trained personnel, hospitals, electricity, and access to roads.

Gynecologists are an important piece in this large puzzle but they do not hold the solution. Once again, the system in place needs to be addressed.

4. Professors/Lecturers – The rate of Education and literacy is an ongoing issue in West African countries. The literacy rates in a lot of West African countries are barely above 50%. These figures need to change but to change them we need more educational institutions in place. Just as we have mentioned primary education, we’ll also mention tertiary education.

These four professions touch on the pillars of the Ri’ayah foundation. The Ri’ayah foundation stands for healthcare, leadership, nutrition, inspiration and motivation. These are qualities Ri’ayah aims to pass on to the children of Liberia. To do that, Ri’ayah needs your help. Help impact the lives of children through donations or direct sponsorship.

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